La Posada Hotel & Gardens

"The last of the great railroad hotels...." 

This rambling historic hotel and restaurant sits among extensive gardens and landscaped grounds next to the Santa Fe (Amtrak) Railroad depot in the center of Winslow. A National Historic Landmark, La Posada Hotel offers a unique cultural experience for Southwest travelers. Built in 1929 for the Santa Fe Railway, La Posada is truly one of America’s treasures.

La Posada is renowned as the last major railroad hotel to be conceived and designed by Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter, the famed architect of many Grand Canyon, Harvey House, and Santa Fe Railroad hotels across the west. It was Fred Harvey who hired Colter to design the hotel; it embodied her vision, from its architecture down to its finely crafted details.  

Mary Colter always began designing her buildings by creating a rich fantasy about their history. She envisioned La Posada as the grand hacienda of a wealthy Spanish landowner, whose family lived here for 120 years, occasionally expanding the hotel until it finally resembled the structure as seen today. This fantasy guided every aspect of her architectural design.

Colter and Harvey conceived La Posada as both a haven for weary travelers and a luxurious resort for tourists eager to explore the Four Corners Region. The "Pueblo Deco" hotel recreates the look and feel of an early Spanish hacienda, with lush grounds, gardens, and fountains.

La Posada has a long, remarkable history, from the days when Winslow was a key waypoint for transcontinental travelers, and the largest city in the region. Winslow is on both historic Route 66 and the Santa Fe (now the Amtrak) rail line, and from 1929 on, is also a key terminal for Transcontinental Air Transport—the first "Lindbergh Line."

Winslow was/is the jumping-off point for tourism to the Grand Canyon, Monument Valley, and other Four Corners attractions. Passengers on the Santa Fe Chief and other famed luxury trains, as well as on the TAT's Ford Trimotors and later DC-3's, stopped over at La Posada for extended HarveyCar Tours. 

However, the railroad's original La Posada Hotel closed in 1957, and for 40 years, its future was uncertain. At last, in 1997, Allan Affeldt and his wife, artist Tina Mion, purchased the hotel with a vision of returning La Posada to Colter’s original concept. A phased restoration plan enabled the first guest rooms and public areas to be reopened within three years, and is ongoing. Today, the gardens, restaurant, and two gift shops further recreate the ambience of the railroad hotel's heyday, and Colter's vision.

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Location

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Latitude: 35.02183 Longitude: -110.694916 Elevation: 4852 ft
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Lodging Style and Amenities

Many of the guest rooms at La Posada are named after famed celebrities who visited the region and stayed in these very rooms—Charles Lindbergh and Ann Morrow, Clark Gable, Mae West, John Wayne, Mary Pickford, Amelia Earhardt, Jimmy Stewart, and many more.  All rooms are non-smoking.

Each room at La Posada is unique. Furnishings range from Mexican rustic to fine antiques and include many original pieces. Other features include hammered tin or tile mirrors, wrought-iron lamps, and writing tables or desks. South-facing rooms offer views of the Santa Fe trains; other rooms overlook the cottonwood grove and main lawn, the Secret Garden, or Route 66.

The Turquoise Room Restaurant, recently restored and opened for full service dining, has its own backstory....In 1935, Mary Jane Colter was asked to design the private dining car for the Super Chief that was to run from Chicago to Los Angeles in 1936. That luxury car was named the Turquoise Room, and it was a favorite of the studio chiefs and stars of the day for their private dining pleasure.

Now, the Turquoise Room, La Posada's elegant restaurant, is open for all meals daily, blending spectacular food with a delightful, historic environment. A unique restaurant in Arizona, under the hand of chef John Sharpe, the Turquoise Room offers a mouthwatering selection of Native American food, fresh seafood, southwestern food, wine, coffee, martinis, and more.

Seasons Open

Four seasons—La Posada is open year-round.

Recreational Opportunities

Winslow is a classic Historic Route 66 town, and is an international tourism destination in its own right. It is also an ideal tourism base for explorations across the Four Corners to the Grand Canyon, Petrified Forest, Painted Desert, Monument Valley, Lake Powell, the Hopi Mesas, Canyon de Chelly, and many other scenic and historic attractions. 

Rate Range

Rooms range in price from $119 to $169, for Standard, Balcony, Whirlpool, and Deluxe.

Driving Directions

La Posada Hotel is centrally located in historic downtown Winslow, a mile south of Interstate 40 at the intersection of Route 66 (now called 2nd Street) and State Route 87. The La Posada properties also include the Amtrak depot—the legendary Southwest Chief stops here twice daily.

Eco-Friendly Notes

La Posada strives to offer the finest local and regional art and crafts selections in both gift shops. In addition, the extensive garden complex is being restored to the Colter vision, in a sustainable manner.

For those dining in the Turquoise Room, only the finest and freshest ingredients are used. During the summer, fresh herbs and vegetables come from growers in the Verde Valley, Chino Valley, and here in Winslow. In winter, much of the produce comes from Crooked Sky Farms of Glendale, Arizona. La Posada also uses local honey, goat cheese, beans, and roasted corn grown on the reservations, as well as the famous piki bread made by some wonderful Hopi women.

Locally or Family Owned Business Notes

Allan Affeldt and his wife Tina Mion are the owners who saved La Posada from the wrecker's ball, and Affeldt has also served as the mayor of Winslow. Daniel Lutzick is the the third partner and General Manager.

Pet Friendly Notes

Well-behaved pets are welcome; pets must be registered at check-in for an additional $10.

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